Daydreamer

believe in yourself

388 notes

14-billion-years-later:

Replacement Jaw Made Using 3D PrintingOne of the benefits of 3D printing is that it enables to essentially download spare parts for cars or electronics. Well, now you may be able to download spare parts for yourself (surgeons not included). An 83 year old woman from the Netherlands has now become part cyborg after a chronic bone infection meant her lower jaw had to be removed. No worries though, a new jaw was simply made by fusing together titanium dust using a laser, one layer at a time, in a manner very similar to more conventional 3D printing. It takes 33 layers to make up 1 mm of height and was then covered in ceramic. The surgery itself only took 4 hours, a fifth of the time usually required for reconstructive surgery of this type. The woman was also able to return after only 4 days and was apparently capable of uttering a few words directly after surgery.

14-billion-years-later:

Replacement Jaw Made Using 3D Printing

One of the benefits of 3D printing is that it enables to essentially download spare parts for cars or electronics. Well, now you may be able to download spare parts for yourself (surgeons not included). An 83 year old woman from the Netherlands has now become part cyborg after a chronic bone infection meant her lower jaw had to be removed. No worries though, a new jaw was simply made by fusing together titanium dust using a laser, one layer at a time, in a manner very similar to more conventional 3D printing. It takes 33 layers to make up 1 mm of height and was then covered in ceramic. The surgery itself only took 4 hours, a fifth of the time usually required for reconstructive surgery of this type. The woman was also able to return after only 4 days and was apparently capable of uttering a few words directly after surgery.

611 notes

jtotheizzoe:

After Recess, We’ll Be Inventing New Molecules
You give some kids an atomic model set and they immediately fall asleep. Others, they struggle to recreate even a water molecule. Ten year-old Clara Lazen? She invented a new molecule.
Playing around in her 5th-grade class, she arranged carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms into a molecule that had never been seen before. But when a local chemist studied the structure, the bonds all fit like they should and the structure was realistic, at the very least. They called it tetranitratoxycarbon.
Now Clara has her name on a research paper, and despite the possible application of the molecule to explosives, she’s pretty excited to be a part of such an awesome science project.
Check out a video feature on her discovery here.
(via Humboldt State Now, image above of chemist Bob Zoellner with a model of tetranitratoxycarbon)

jtotheizzoe:

After Recess, We’ll Be Inventing New Molecules

You give some kids an atomic model set and they immediately fall asleep. Others, they struggle to recreate even a water molecule. Ten year-old Clara Lazen? She invented a new molecule.

Playing around in her 5th-grade class, she arranged carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms into a molecule that had never been seen before. But when a local chemist studied the structure, the bonds all fit like they should and the structure was realistic, at the very least. They called it tetranitratoxycarbon.

Now Clara has her name on a research paper, and despite the possible application of the molecule to explosives, she’s pretty excited to be a part of such an awesome science project.

Check out a video feature on her discovery here.

(via Humboldt State Now, image above of chemist Bob Zoellner with a model of tetranitratoxycarbon)

1,237 notes

cosmosmagazine:

The tarsier - a shy, wide-eyed nocturnal species from the Philippines  - is the first primate to be identified as having the ability to  communicate in purely ultrasonic frequencies.
A new study published in Biology Letters today has revealed that the endangered Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta) communicates using sound with a frequency greater than 20 kilohertz.  The finding contradicts conventional thinking that all primate  vocaliations are audible to humans.
Read story here.
Image credit: David Haring

cosmosmagazine:

The tarsier - a shy, wide-eyed nocturnal species from the Philippines - is the first primate to be identified as having the ability to communicate in purely ultrasonic frequencies.

A new study published in Biology Letters today has revealed that the endangered Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta) communicates using sound with a frequency greater than 20 kilohertz. The finding contradicts conventional thinking that all primate vocaliations are audible to humans.

Read story here.

Image credit: David Haring

(via )